jtotheizzoe:

Meet Ham, the first primate in space! He took off on a suborbital space flight on January 31, 1961, preceding the USSR’s Yuri Gagarin into space by two and a half months.
His name stands for Holloman Aerospace Medical center, the Air Force base where he completed his training and mission prep. Of course, he was far from the only animal trained for the space program on either side of the Iron Curtain. NASA has written up an extensive history of animal astronauts (not all of it good, I’m afraid).
Check out this super-interesting, and slightly uncomfortable, 1961 newsreel film about Ham: Trailblazer in Space.

Ham lived, presumably happily, until 1983, when he died at the National Zoo and North Carolina Zoo. His remains were buried at the International Space Hall of Fame to commemorate his service to manned space flight. Way to go, little man.

jtotheizzoe:

Meet Ham, the first primate in space! He took off on a suborbital space flight on January 31, 1961, preceding the USSR’s Yuri Gagarin into space by two and a half months.

His name stands for Holloman Aerospace Medical center, the Air Force base where he completed his training and mission prep. Of course, he was far from the only animal trained for the space program on either side of the Iron Curtain. NASA has written up an extensive history of animal astronauts (not all of it good, I’m afraid).

Check out this super-interesting, and slightly uncomfortable, 1961 newsreel film about Ham: Trailblazer in Space.

Ham lived, presumably happily, until 1983, when he died at the National Zoo and North Carolina Zoo. His remains were buried at the International Space Hall of Fame to commemorate his service to manned space flight. Way to go, little man.

giantcypress:

Hanging wall cabinet, made by George Nakashima out of cherry in 1958, on display at the Newark Museum. The most interesting thing to me is the use of dowel joints alongside the expected dovetails.

Also note that the angles of these dovetails are fairly acute compared to the skinny-pin dovetails seen on many pieces. The pieces that I saw on my visit to the Nakashima workshop showed that this was a fairly consistent practice by George Nakashima.